Category: calgary real estate (27)

buying a home in Calgary
Initial Perspective

We’ve worked with countless buyers over the years who have been looking to buy a house in Calgary, and have had the opportunity to counsel them on a proven strategy to discover their best home.  When we first sit down with home buyers, we like to first get their perspective on how they envision finding a home. The thing is, it’s not always an intuitive process. Most have a list of features they want in a home, but don’t know how to best translate their wants and needs to a systematic home evaluation process. This is the start of the home buying process.

 

Real Estate BUYING 101

In addition to answering questions about real estate, we get our clients’ initial thoughts on what they’re looking for, we engage in a thorough ‘Calgary Real Estate 101’ to identify various aspects that enhance value in properties, specifically in Calgary. The concepts are abstract though intuitive and by the end of the session, the drivers of value in the local real estate market are easily understood.

 

What about market conditions?

Market conditions are an important factor in any decision to buy a home, and we ensure that the past, current, and future market conditions are explained in a simple manner.  Knowing where we sit in the real estate cycle allows our buyers to make better decisions about timing and their investment.

 

The Process

Combining basic real estate concepts with market analysis, we’ve developed a process which enables our buyers to make intelligent and informed decisions about where they live and how to best invest their hard earned money. This approach has led to countless buyers making the best decision possible to achieve their goals, and gain and retain as much equity as possible during every swing in the market.

 

Your Search

Now that our clients understand the value and the market, and we understand their needs and wants, we mesh these concepts with a systematic process to produce a unique home search for our clients. If you would like to begin your search early you can visit this great property search tool.

If your worried about the costs of using a Realtor as a buyer, don’t be, it’s free! Here you can find more information.

 

sales-by-price-range-sept-2014Strong Condo sales aided by single family sales in the sub $1M range buoyed Calgary real estate market over the summer months. Buyers will appreciate that a gradual increase in inventory levels has created more selection and choice along with a less hectic pace to the process. Overall we are seeing the market calm down from the bell market we experienced over the past few years. While the forecast for jobs and in migration slows moderately over the next few years there still remains plenty of fuel for growth in the real estate market. Sectors that remain in hot demand are moderate priced homes and townhomes in walkable communities or good transit accessible areas. We also witness an increase in demand for moderate homes suitable for retirement lifestyles with amenities such as single level flats, accessibility (elevators), moderate sizes, low maintenance and security.

 

 

inventory-sept-2014We also are witnessing a greater demand for green and low energy features that are environmentally sensitive. Expect this trend to continue to grow as utilities consume a greater portion of the homeowner’s budget and concern for the environment becomes mainstream. Areas of the market we witness declining are large homes with less efficient maintenance requirements generally on acreages or not within walkable communities and usually over $1M price range. Looking forward we expect that the greater number of condo starts will begin to over supply this market over the next two year time frame. Also an increase in the cost of construction will place upward pressure on prices squeezing margins for developers. Look for a trend to more compact efficiently designed homes with a green influence along with new solutions for affordable housing including laneway housing, secondary suites and new density options for single family developers.

For detailed information of the Calgary Real estate market or a complimentary consultation call Sano Stante Real Estate at 403-289-3435

IMG_0088My relationship to secondary suites began before I did. Ortona is a town in Italy that Canadian forces liberated and my parents were resided in the adjacent town of Fossacesia. WW2 left the area in ruins and it held little promise for a young couple to grow a family. When a relative sent news from Calgary and partly due to their fondness for Canadians, they set sail for Halifax. Arriving in Calgary with a few dollars to their name, they discovered accommodation was scarce and at a premium. They found a makeshift suite in the attic of a two storey home offered by a fellow immigrant. It was sparse and barely insulated, but in relative terms from the war-torn area they had just left, they were very happy to have the accommodation. My Mom would comment later in life that while living in that hobbled suite, they had some of the best times of their life.
Sometimes adversity is a blessing. During the war my father was interned in a prisoner of war camp, but the experience had taught him to speak and write English. As a result Dad got on quite well here and ultimately sponsored many of the Italian immigrants who wanted to start a new life in Canada. My parents would often share their suite with new arrivals until they landed on their feet and before long they were able to purchase a home on Child Avenue where I began my life. We always had a relative or friend living in the basement of that home which helped them all get started financially – it was just the perfectly normal thing to do.
A few years passed and my parents purchased a lot where they built a new home. It was a traditional raised bungalow perched high above Bridgeland with a walkout basement and a separate entrance for a secondary suite. At first we lived in the suite while my Dad finished the larger main floor area. In those days you paid for things as you had the money, so it took some time to build and pay for the home but in the meanwhile the suite provided comfortable accommodation. Once the main floor was finished we moved up and they set out to rent the suite. With no shortage of new immigrants moving to Calgary the suite hosted young couples from France, Denmark, Germany, Poland and Italy. As a child I was a curious participant in every activity around our home. I’m sure that I was mostly a nuisance to our tenants, but I always participated in their activities building or fixing everything imaginable. I fondly recall rebuilding engines, a ski-do (from scratch), and I was always made to feel like I was a big help. These wonderful people who resided in our suite became a part of my life and extended family. Outside our home our immediate neighborhood was almost entirely a community of new immigrants; Italian, Austrian, English, German, Polish blended with First Nations. We never thought twice about helping each other for any matter whatsoever. And it was more than perfectly normal to have a suite or let a room to someone who needed a place.
My parents always charged below market rent, so most of our basement renters stayed until they saved up a down-payment for their own home, which they all did. After they moved out we would see them nearly as often, as they frequently stopped by on weekends for dinner and a friendly game of cards.
In time, as the family aged, my parents preferred more privacy and the suite lent itself to teenage independent living. It was also a handy place for a rock-band to rehearse while shutting out those pesky parents. At times it just remained vacant, but always available for extended visitors or a returning child. Later still it would have provided perfect accommodation for a caregiver for my parents.
You see, I’ve always had nothing but good, positive experiences from secondary suites. To me they are a device that enables us to interact positively and directly with our neighbors – helping one another as we naturally would. It connects us and weaves a tighter fabric into our community. Suites provide adaptable spaces that can serve many purposes and extend the utility and value of our homes. (Did you know that the latest trend in home building is adaptable design?) They extend the life of our residence as an investment, allowing for greater return. They allow a new home buyer to purchase a home worth $200,000 more for the same monthly cost due to the rental income. They provide facility for people aging in place, saving both the resident and our government the cost of health care facilities. They provide affordable housing for new immigrants, students, temporary workers and caregivers. They provide elderly a resident eyes and ears to help look after the place (and help boost their retirement income).
When we look at affordable housing we often imagine a housing continuum from most to least affordable. It begins with shared accommodation and boarding houses (mostly extinct now); then secondary suites; apartments, townhomes and finally single family homes. Today, Calgarian’s have a dire need for affordable housing. With the cost of building at an all-time high it seems improbable that we will find a solution to construct apartments or townhomes that are affordable. If this accommodation does not exist, then the increased cost of living is passed on to employers and ultimately consumers and taxpayer – so we all pay or we simply don’t attract new workers and immigration and the accompanying burden this places on our economy.
We have a solution to affordable housing that exists today and costs little to implement. The answer has been right under our nose and yet somehow we have buried it, creating new rules that confuse and class existing suites illegal. And through nothing short of NIMBYism we have restricted the development of new suites. There is no question that the suites need to be safe and we would never argue on issues of safety, but somehow claims of unsafe suites and parking have been grossly exaggerated. A vocal minority has helped perpetrate these urban myths without substance and stymied an open debate where we lay the facts on the table. This issue over secondary suites now appears to have become a political dilemma for Councillors and we owe kudos to those who have shown leadership on this issue. Our City needs this accommodation and any outstanding issues can all be easily addressed but we all need to give our politicians the permission to do the right thing. The right thing now is to legalize suites in all zones. To appease the residents in single family zones, simply adding the provision that in existing single family areas suites shall be allowed only in owner occupied homes settles the score. Calgary is one of the only Cities in North America with such a restrictive secondary suite policy. It’s time we progressed back to our heritage, where suites are embraced as a vital and necessary part of our community.

newplanThe Calgary Real Estate Board reports statistics that indicate we currently have six weeks of available single family inventory (Feb 13/19). The last time I recall our inventory of homes this low was in 2007 and everyone was discussing the critical state of the market. Of course this is a snapshot in time and we will not run out of homes to sell (while we had 447 sales, there were also 612 new listings that week), but it is an indicator of the status of our market, the relative level of inventory and an indication of a buyer or sellers market. In fact, one could assume that the actual level of inventory is even lower due to a CREB rule which does not enforce true reporting of status on their mls system (we don’t know how many homes are actually sold, as clients may instruct to retain an active status while under contract). So without over-analyzing this data, the bottom line is this: The market clearly favors sellers and if you were thinking of selling your real estate in the next while,  there may be no better time than now. We are negotiating record prices for most inner city real estate and even some suburban and acreage properties are selling that have been sitting on the shelf for many months. Where to start? Contact us to get a current state of the market assessment of the value of your home with no obligation and you will be armed with all the facts you need to make an informed decision. Who knows, you may look back in a year or so and marvel at your genius.

13th-Avenue-CalgaryArthur C Nelson’s book “Reshaping Metropolitan America” is a enlightening read that lays bare the facts, trends and demographics that will shape real estate in North America. The data targets the year 2030 and describes in detail how our urban environment is destined to appear in the future and identifies opportunities to leverage positive change to create more vibrant, sustainable urban environments. The take away for me was how much obvious data we have that pretty clearly defines our future environment, how near this future scenario is in relative terms (2030), and that planners, builders and developers are still constructing developments that will be obsolete before the time that these homes requires a new roof (say 15 years). This to me, reeks of opportunity for any astute developer who is willing to change their mind.

If you accept his theory, and its hard to dispute the data, then here’s a synopsis of the opportunities that are presented:

urbrenewal

Key Trends:

  • Developers need to invent new products and financing tools that meet the needs of financially strained households.
  • Rising energy costs will drive the demand for locations that provide live-work opportunities.
  • Multifamily Development will be transit-centric. Single use commercial centers will be converted to mixed use.
  • Boomers will downsize to condos in walk-able neighborhoods.
  • Urban redevelopment is shifting to the suburbs where vast supplies of asphalt provide attractive opportunities for re-purposing.

A New Community Planning Paradigm
The large detached homes on large lots, miles from the urban centers that were once highly valued, will become so out of fashion that they may become our next affordable housing supply. Segregated land use has given way to mixed use development. The automobile is no longer the transport of choice and from all of this some major new planning themes emerge:

  • Sustainable and Healthier Communities is a topic unto itself focused on increased residential density, integrating transportation and land use, providing car-free areas, locally owned stores, walk-able neighborhoods, and accessibility. Design communities to link humans to nature including open spaces, and constructing high performance buildings and district energy.
  • Tearing up the Parking Lots and rebuilding Paradise  – the single largest opportunity for developers to participate in rebuilding sustainable, mixed-use communities.
  • Transit Oriented Developments are a leverage point for future successful urban centers
  • Reforming Land Use Regulation allows developers more latitude to construct mixed use developments and higher density developments where appropriate.

Then there are the more rigorous and equally important challenges that require modifying the tools and institutions to be responsive to market preferences. Here are a few highlights: Tear-down-your-home

  • Make Accessory Dwelling Units (Secondary Suites) Legal
  • Eliminate Social Engineering through incentives to home ownership, allowing rentals an equal footing (mostly applicable to the US but a fair warning for Canada)
  • Level the Home Purchase Playing Field to eliminate any discrimination in financing condos v/s single family homes (again, fair warning).
  • Eliminate Social Engineering through Exclusionary Zoning. Urban areas overly restrict housing types and lot size etc with the effect of steering lower income households into the few jurisdictions that allow high density housing and away from others.
  • Instill Permitting Discipline that restricts over-building more than the market can absorb in times of oversupply.

Its is hard to dispute the data  which describes how out of sync the current trajectory for our future urban centers is with our future needs. We could gripe about the discord or marvel at the opportunity. Builders and developers need to stop building yesterdays housing in outdated community models and start building energy and space efficient housing in communities with mixed use and walk-able amenities. Make provisions for a secondary suite to house an extended family or allow a senior to house a student or caregiver that would allow them to age in place. And our Civic and Provincial Governments needs to allow this development and remove the barriers that make it illegal to innovate and build new housing models.  If not, the home you build today may be obsolete before it’s time to replace your roof.

market value of home

Before you can make an informed decision about selling your home you often need to verify the Market Value of your Home. Market Value is defined as the price that you could expect to sell your Home on the open market given a normal period of exposure. Receiving an accurate estimate of the Market Value can be crucial if your next purchase depends on the equity in your existing home, or if your finances allow little margin for error. What then is the best method of obtaining the most accurate estimate of Market Value?

There are several routes to obtaining  an estimate of market value and a handful of methods which can be employed, most based on accepted appraisal practice. One method would be to simply hire a Certified Appraiser to complete a “market value” appraisal of your home.  Appraisers will prepare market value appraisals and are bound by guidelines to use similar comparable properties which have sold in the past six months. A market value appraisal is just that: an estimate of what the property would fetch on the open market and this typically is the most applicable. Other types of appraisals include income valuations, which are generally used in income producing property and replacement cost, which is applicable for insurance valuation. To have an appraisal prepared you would contact a certified appraiser from the Appraisal Institute of Canada.

Some homeowners base their value on their City Assessment and while this can provide a rough estimate, these values can range widely and should not be used as a reliable indicator or your current market value. City Assessments are based on a model of mass appraisal which estimates the broad value of your type of home based on similar homes in your surrounding area.

The third method would be to use the services of an experienced Real Estate Agent to evaluate the market value. The advantage of this method is that while Appraisers are bound to use historical methods to estimate the value of your home at the present time, an agent can draw upon the same broad base of comparable sales and can extrapolate into the the future based on current market conditions. This is very important in a rapidly changing market (of rising or declining values) where  you need to know the value based on the intricacies of a complex local market which is in flux. Using this local and up to the minute intelligence, an experienced agent can ensure that you extract every dollar of value and don’t leave any money on the table in an increasing market. Similarly when the market is declining, a good Agent will provide knowledge that will place you ahead of the market and allow you to sell before the market declines.
The disadvantage of using an agent is simply the nature of the industry where there are hundreds of agents with a variety of skill sets and competencies competing for your business. This makes it important that you use the most knowledgeable, experienced and trustworthy agent to ensure that the agent does not simply “buy your business” by giving you a favorable number that appeases you and then lets you down later when the market provides you the stark reality of your homes value.

Sano Stante Real Estate  provides premium real estate service to discerning Calgary area clientele for over 30 years. If you are thinking of selling, call us to receive an expert market evaluation of your home.

Home Appraisal

Home Appraisal

Selling your home is only half of the process – after the sale is conditional your home needs to pass the appraisal test. Given the importance of this step many clients ask ” How can I improve my Home Appraisal”?
It’s a common myth that “bank appraisals” are always conservatively low, but is that really true? Understanding the appraisal process can shed some light on home values and show you how you can enable your appraiser to substantiate the highest value possible.
First it’s important to understand the rules of engagement. Appraisals are based on recent sales usually limited to the past 6 months sales of comparable properties. In a rapidly rising market this explains why it is often difficult for appraisers to find evidence that proves the current values. Of course the opposite is also true and in a declining market often appraised values can tend to be overstated.

Here are a few ways ways you can help to improve your home appraisal:

  • Ensure the Appraiser is knowledgeable about your area. Especially in inner city communities where there are a myriad of factors that affect value and where values are extremely diverse.
  • Do your own homework. Appraisers rely on MLS data so if you are aware of private sales or the unique circumstances behind any MLS sales be sure to provide this information to the appraiser. You’ll be doing some of the appraisers work, but the payback could be well worth it.
  • Boast about the Calgary Neighborhood Information  If there are unique amenities or attractions that locals covet, now is not the time to keep them a secret. Be sure to inform your appraiser.
  • Document your improvements. If you’ve spent money on improvements be sure to document and show these to the appraiser. Especially important to point out are those improvements that are not readily apparent such as electrical and plumbing upgrades, insulation and other improvements hidden behind the walls. Don’t be hesitant to show receipts to prove the work you’ve done.
  • Understand which improvements add the most value. Kitchens and bathrooms provide the greatest return on your investment. Paint and flooring are next in providing the best bang for your buck, followed by curb appeal and landscaping.
  • Clean up. Ensure that the home is meticulously clean and the entryway shows well. Removing excessive furniture can make a home feel larger. Manicure the walkway to the home. Remove clutter and excess of photos and nik-naks. Remove all the magnets off your fridge and pack loose items in boxes that can be stored in the garage.
  • Understand your home size. MLS and Appraisal rules state that measured size must be area that is above grade. If adding size to your home understand how this will be measured and accounted for in the future. If you add space below grade, it will not count as added living area.
  • Give the Appraiser some space. As in showing any home to a potential client, don’t follow them around breathing over their shoulder. Provide the appraiser some space to let them make their own assessment and take their time to absorb and appreciate the beauty and value of your home.

Remember that appraisers prove value based on sales values in the past, but may not be attuned to market trends going forward. Understanding the current market and trends could enable you to extract many thousands of dollars of value from your home. This is where an expert real estate agent can help a tremendous amount. To ensure that you receive the highest value for your real estate investment before you sell contact Sano Stante Real Estate.

 

 

real-estate-market2

With national forecasts citing an overheated market in decline and calling for a further correction in real estate values, it’s curious to watch the Calgary Real Estate market out-perform most every other City and region in the country. Much of this performance is due to the hang-over from the recent run of strong net in-migration, due to a buoyant job market in Alberta. The question is when will the hang-over end and will Calgary succumb to the negative national trend despite our favourable geography and oil economy?

Calgary employment  growth for 2013 is forecast to decline, yet remain positive at 2.3% with net migration for Calgary expected to slow to just over 15,000 over the next two years. This steady stream of new residents has fueled an increased demand for rental accommodation resulting in an apartment vacancy rate under 1.3%. This all points to a positive, yet somewhat reduced pace of activity that fuels the Calgary real estate market.

With the recent surge in rental activity and subsequent increase in rental rates one could be tempted to purchase rental property based on the recent higher returns, but are these rents sustainable for the long term? We advise that any rental properties are evaluated using conservative rent estimates especially those based on furnished rentals. Also note that vacancy for furnished rentals is similar to that of Hotel properties (in the 20-40% range) so don’t be fooled into using unfurnished vacancy rates and applying these to furnished properties, despite our current hot market. One exception could be buying rental properties that have a high component of land value, especially in inner city communities. These properties could derive good income from the building for many years, yet the land value may surpass its’ income value, if the trend toward inner-city community development continues.

Farmland also has potential as a solid income producing vehicle, but be sure to know what you’re buying. While crop rents have increased dramatically (proportional to crop prices), soil types, local geography, irrigation and overburdened crops all have a profound effect on the return a farmer can extract from a section of land. Again there may be other exit options for farm land such as future development potential or subdivision to smaller parcels. This can yield large returns but not for the faint of heart or uninitiated. If you are not the expert, be certain to obtain expert advice (the cost of which could yield you the best return for your investment).

One of the best strategies today for those who already hold real estate is to optimize your investment. That means reducing your operating costs and improving efficiency of the property. Some of the greatest benefits can be derived from reducing the energy requirements and  greening your real estate. This not only reduces your consumption and cost of energy, but also improves the desirability of your property. Green Calgary offers a valuable home audit that provides excellent advice on greening your home and reducing its energy footprint. With the cost of solar electric continuing to decline we are now coming into an age that photo-voltaic systems are becoming cost effective. It won’t be long before you may be asking “how much energy does this property generate and how much income does it produce?” Don’t overlook these possibilities and the potential value of solar exposure when evaluating your next  property.

Overall, it appears that the market may reduce from a rolling boil to a slow simmer over the next few years which calls for a return to a more sober, long term view of any real estate investment. Reducing operating costs could help you weather future bumps in the road, and exploring alternate exit strategies can add tremendous value if the need for Return Of Investment becomes more important than the need for Return On Investment.

Hot-Real-Estate-Market
Wondering what YYC real estate is doing in 2013? We checked out the latest trends and  hot spots to keep you riding the wave.

  1. Tighter Inventory and a faster moving market: While the rest of the world took a real estate holiday the Calgary real estate market has been chugging along quite well (thank you very much) and steadily chewing up any over supply of  inventory left over from the 07 bump. Inventory has been steadily dropping across all categories but most noticeably in the single family mid-range market.
  2. Gentrification is the new normal: Mature, inner- city communities and those with plenty of walkable amenities are blushing with all the attention they’re getting. Buyers are not shy about knocking down modest homes on good lots or renovating homes that have the bones and adequate floor plate.
  3. Mortgage rates will remain low: However, banks have not opened up the taps to ease the flow of cash to new buyers. This is keeping the brakes on the market nationally and puts a squeeze on first time buyers or those who need to refinance. This keeps a lid on the entry level market but upper end buyers have capital so expect some cautious expansion in the premium and luxury arenas.
  4. An ample supply of starter homes and apartments: Condo prices rose the least over any other sector this past year due to a fairly competitive market and a good supply of new developments. Developers are upbeat and many national developers are focusing their effort in Calgary bringing some fresh products and new innovation to this market.
  5. Price Increases will be moderate for Condos: The condo markets experienced a 3% increase last year. Expect that this steady price increase will continue and likely accelerate this year. Rising construction costs and the depletion of cheaper land will bear on the prices as developers have nowhere to go except pass on these increases to buyers.
  6. Rental Boom: There, we said the B word, and it applies right now to the rental market. A tighter mortgage market lends to a better rental market. It also appears that many of the new local hires are provided a leased property to supplement their 2 or 3 year employment contracts. As a result, the market for both bare and furnished rentals has boomed over the past couple years. This had the positive effect of absorbing some excess inventory that Buyers purchased in 07, and keeping many properties off the market that otherwise would be currently available for sale. Be cautious to purchase investment property based on inflated rental rates unless you have good reason to believe they are  sustainable. Keep an eye on this trend, as it will be interesting to see what our real estate market will look like in 2015-16 when many of these rentals come back to market.
  7. Bedroom Communities are wide awake: Developers have discovered that it’s cheaper and easier to develop in neighboring communities than more expensive and onerous Calgary subdivisions. With City Hall levying higher taxes on suburban builders to more reflect the real cost of services they tap into, Developers are voting with their feet and developing where they can get the best leverage. This means more focus on these bedroom communities outside the City and that’s where we saw much of the action this past year. Expect this to continue in the short term until these bedroom communities start to realize they face the same challenges as Calgary (and implement similar solutions to pay for infrastructure).
  8. Infills get better: Attached is the new normal and three storey infills become more common. Accompanying this trend, look for builders to provide (roughed in) elevators as a new standard to accommodate a broader demographic of Buyer. Cottage homes above garages will receive more attention, as well as underground basement access from the home to the detached garage. These tunnels can be used for additional space, storage, wine rooms and such and don’t add to your development footprint.

For more insights into the Calgary real estate market or your Calgary neighborhood contact us

contractors

Here’s a few key contractor questions to ask and steps to follow before hiring a contractor of any type, including handymen:

1. Know specifically  what you want to have done. Try to have plans drawn up by an Architect or Designer. The more information you have available for the  contractor, the better. You should also be able to obtain a more precise quote for the work and be better able to compare at least two or three competitive quotes.

2. Try to get  personal referrals, rather than relying on the phone book or internet. Ask a  friend or a relative who has had some work done on their home – that’s a great starting point. You can get some honest feedback  about the contractor’s skill level, price, scheduling, level of cooperation,  and much more. There are a lot of contractors out there to choose from, and  like most businesses, they succeed or fail mostly by their reputation so a  good referral is very helpful.

There are other sources of referrals as well. If you see  some work going on down the street, stop and talk to the homeowner. Most people  are more than willing to share their experiences – both good and bad – about  the contractor they’ve hired, and here again you can get some great firsthand  information.

Material suppliers are also great sources. Ask the people  where you buy your lumber or your plumbing supplies if they know of anyone  who’s particularly good at the type of project you have in mind. Retailers have  a reputation to protect as well — they want to keep you happy and coming back  as a customer — so they will typically refer only those contractors who they know are honest and will do a quality job.

Other good sources of referrals include real estate agents,  insurance agents, property managers, your utility company, and your local  building department inspector.

3. When you have a  referral or two, call the contractors to set up an appointment. Ask the  following four questions:

  • Do they do the specific type of work you’re looking for? It could be they no longer do kitchens or room additions, or they now do remodeling and have stopped building new homes.  Clarify this on the first call.
  • What is their schedule like? If you have a project that has to be done within the next month and the contractor can’t even start until then, there’s no point in wasting your  time or theirs.
  • Can they provide you with referrals? Most companies are more than willing to provide you with names and phone numbers of past clients. If they can’t or won’t provide you with referrals, don’t hire them. Between the time you call the contractor and the time the contractor comes out, be sure to follow up on a couple of the referrals and get some feedback from the homeowners. If possible, see if the referral would allow you to view the contractor’s work in person.
  • What is the contractor’s name and license number? Get the contractor’s full legal business name, address  and business phone number, as well as their contractor’s license number.  Follow up on this information, and verify that all of the proper bonds and insurance policies are in place (including workers compensation for their employees).

At Sano Stante Real Estate we maintain a list of qualified contractors as a service to our clients to prepare their home for sale or to upgrade a home that they have just purchased. Please call us and we can provide you with a list of these proven trades.